The Quietest Treadmills of 2021

The Quietest Treadmills

Getting in your cardio workout can be quite a noisy exercise. That is especially the case when it comes to running on a treadmill. If you’re living in an apartment complex or plan to train when others in the home are sleeping or watching TV, you’ve got a problem. Fortunately, there are some impressively quiet home use treadmills on the market. But you have to do your research to find them … 

Or else you can read this comprehensive quietest treadmills review. I’ve already put in the hours of legwork to uncover the best noise-reducing treadmills on the market right now. I’m about to share the top 9, along with a breakdown of the key features to keep in mind when you’re shopping for a quiet treadmill for your apartment.

A Quick Overview of the Top 3

Best Overall Quiet Treadmill: Lifespan TR30001 Folding Treadmill

  • Whisper-quiet operation
  • Lots of programs
  • Auto incline
  • Powerful motor
  • Max speed 12 mph

Best Curved Quiet Treadmill: Assault Fitness Air Runner

  • Very natural running motion
  • User friendly
  • Minimalistic
  • Manual powered

Best Budget Quiet Treadmill: Merax 501 Electric Folding Treadmill

  • Great price
  • Foldable
  • 12 workout programs
  • Compact

The 9 Quietest Treadmills:

1. Lifespan TR30001 Folding Treadmill

Quietest Treadmill on the Market

Lifespan TR30001 Folding Treadmill

Pros:

  • Whisper-quiet operation
  • Lots of programs
  • Auto incline
  • Powerful motor
  • Max speed 12 mph

Cons:

  • Belt length only 56 inches

The Lifespan TR30001 treadmill is the quietest treadmill we have seen, folding or non-folding, that I have come across. This is a powerful machine, providing you with a 2.75 CHP motor to deliver a max speed of 12 miles per hour. On top of that, this is a folding machine that is very apartment-friendly. It features the EZ Drop folding system that makes it a piece of cake to handle. The folding dimensions are 33 x 39 inches, making it ideal for slipping under your bed when not in use.

Another standout feature of this treadmill is its 15 levels of automatic incline. That provides you with a ton of extra intensity training options. In addition, you get plenty of capability built into the console of this machine. With five fat loss programs, another five healthy living routines, two heart rate programs, and seven sports training-specific workouts, this machine covers all your bases.

2. Assault Fitness Air Runner

Quietest Curved Treadmill

Assault Fitness Air Runner

Pros:

  • Very natural running motion
  • User friendly
  • Minimalistic
  • Manual powered

Cons:

  • No direct speed or intensity control
  • Running belt a little narrow

The Assault Fitness Air Runner is one of the most popular curved treadmills on the market right now. This innovative new class of treadmill features a special curved design that allows you to self propel your workout. That means that you do not have any motor noise to contend with (because there is no motor!). You are able to achieve a far more natural running action on this machine, but there is a bit of a learning curve if you are used to running on a standard electronic treadmill.

The running belt on the Assault Fitness Air Runner measures 17 inches wide and 62.2 inches in length. That is quite a narrow running width in comparison to a standard electronic treadmill. However, this is not a true comparison as the running action on a curved treadmill is more natural and doesn’t require as much width. 

The Assault Fitness curved treadmill will take a bit of getting used to. You do not have all the console bells and whistles that you would expect on an electronic treadmill. Neither are you able to input the speed or resistance level. They are generated by the speed at which you are running. However, once you get accustomed to this machine, it will provide you with a superior, more natural running experience.

3. Merax 501 Electric Folding Treadmill

Best Budget Quiet Treadmill

Merax 501 Electric Folding Treadmill

Pros:

  • Great price
  • Foldable
  • 12 workout programs
  • Compact

Cons:

  • Narrow running belt
  • No incline

The Merax 501 Electric Folding Treadmill is a rare example of a functional, quiet treadmill that you can purchase for under $500. It is compact and foldable, making it a good option for people who have limited space to work out in. It is also lightweight, making it easy to move around. That lightweight does mean that this unit is not as flexible as most of the others on this review list. Of course, we need to keep in mind that this is a budget treadmill so we need to compare apples with apples. In its price range, it is no less stable than the competition.

You get a dozen pre-set workout programs on this treadmill, which is impressive for a budget model. There is also a safety stop key that allows you to immediately cut the power if you get into trouble while exercising. The maximum running speed on this treadmill is 7.5 miles per hour, which is standard for a treadmill priced under $500. 

4. NordicTrack X22i Incline Treadmill

NordicTrack X22i Incline Treadmill

Pros:

  • Incline ranging from -6 to +40 percent
  • Consistently ranked among the quietest treadmills
  • Integrated Sled Push
  • 50+ programs
  • Wireless chest strap

Cons:

  • Non-adjustable cushioning

The NordicTrack X22i Incline treadmill is the quietest high-end treadmill that I have come across. A highlight of this machine is that it provides incline capability which is double that of most home-use treadmills.  That incline range, between -6 and +40 percent, in conjunction with the max speed of 12 miles per hour, allows for an extremely intense workout. Incline training is also less impactful on your joints. 

Another cool feature of this treadmill is its integrated sled push feature by way of the built-in push bar and sled grips. This allows you to get in a great lower body push workout similar to the sled work done in the gym and in football training. 

The NordicTrack X22i features a high-definition 22-inch touchscreen. You get a free 1-year subscription to iFit when you purchase this treadmill, providing a huge amount of virtual training choices. On top of that, you get in excess of 50 built-in programs with this machine. The 22 x 60 inch wide running belt allows for plenty of room to move. 

5. GoPlus Electric Folding Treadmill

GoPlus Electric Folding Treadmill

Pros:

  • Foldable
  • 12 workout programs
  • Adjustable incline to 15 percent
  • Max user weight 200 lbs

Cons:

  • Quite lightweight
  • 16.5-inch running belt width
  • Max speed just 7.5 mph

The GoPlus Electric Folding Treadmill is a folding treadmill that provides a solid workout experience at an affordable price. It’s one of the quietest treadmills in its price range that I have come across. The shock absorbency system on this machine is very good. Not only does that provide you with a low-impact running experience, it also reduces the noise level. 

The GoPlus Electric Folding Treadmill features a 2.5 hp motor. That allows for a max speed of 7.5 miles per hour. That will allow for a decent running and jogging pace but will not be enough for those who are after some serious running. Also, the running belt width is just 16.5 inches, which will be a problem for larger people. 

There are a dozen built-in workout programs on this treadmill that cover all training goals. The console is also compatible with the Google Fit app to allow you to track your workout after your session is over. 

6. Sole F80 Folding Treadmill

Sole F80

Pros:

  • 3.5 hp motor
  • 22 x 60-inch running belt
  • Reversible deck
  • 10 built-in programs

Cons:

  • Short side rails

The Sole F80 is a popular treadmill for the home that has been recently updated to make it even better. Standout features are a powerful 3.5 hp commercial-grade motor and a large 22 x 60-inch running belt. The top speed is 12 miles per hour and you get a maximum 15 percent incline. This combination allows for even the fittest among us to get a great workout in. 

Another great innovation with Sole F80 is the reversible deck. You can simply flip the deck to effectively double its life span. There are ten built-in workout programs on this machine that have been created by fitness professionals and cover all fitness goals. These programs are shown on a 9-inch LCD display. There is also a secure tablet holder to enable you to connect with apps that provide further training options.

The Sole F80 is Bluetooth compatible, providing an instant connection with the Sole Fitness app to monitor and analyze your key workout diagnostics. I’m also impressed with the warranty on this treadmill; you get a lifetime warranty on the frame, the motor, and the deck, with 5 years on electronics and parts. You also get two years coverage on labor.

7. Bowflex BXT116

Bowflex BXT116

Pros:

  • Very powerful motor
  • Burn rate console
  • Wireless chest strap
  • 20 x 60-inch running belt

Cons:

  • Limited built-in programs

The Bowflex BXT116 treadmill is a relatively new entry to the treadmill landscape. The 3.75 hp motor provides a max speed of 12 miles per hour. That huge level of power output also ensures that your treadmill operation is exceedingly smooth and jerk-free. This machine also features a triple-layer running belt to dramatically reduce the joint impact of your workout. This is much more than you find on most home-use treadmills. As well as being joint-friendly, the triple layer of cushioning also contributes to the impressive low noise output of this machine.

In addition to the normal data readouts, this treadmill provides you with a per-minute calorie burn calculation that gives you immediate feedback on your caloric expenditure. As well as the contact heart rate that is built into the handlebars, you also get a free wireless heart rate monitor to provide the most accurate pulse monitoring.

The running belt dimensions of 20 x 60 inches provide a generous amount of room to move. The only slight negative I could find with the Bowflex BXT116 is the fact that you only get 9 inbuilt workout programs. 

Pros:

  • Well priced
  • Very quiet
  • 10 percent incline

Cons:

  • Short running track

The Horizon T101 sells for well less than a thousand dollars, making it another attractively priced model. This is one of the quietest we have come across, with its noise level being just 73 decibels at the maximum speed of 10 miles per hour. Bluetooth speakers are built into the console, along with nine workout programs and three data display windows to provide you with a constant display of your key training diagnostics.

The stability of the Horizon 101 is impressive for a budget treadmill. It can support a maximum user weight of 300 pounds. The solid frame and sturdy base also help to keep the treadmill operating quietly. It should be noted, however, that the running belt on this treadmill is quite small with a width of just 17 inches and a length of 60 inches. You can, though, spend another couple of hundred dollars to get the next model up from Horizon, which provides you with a 60-inch running belt length. 

9. MaxKare Folding Treadmill

MaxKare Folding Treadmill

Pros:

  • 15 built-in programs
  • Multi-layer running belt tread
  • Soft drop folding system

Cons:

  • No auto incline
  • Max user weight only 220 pounds.

The MaxKare folding electronic treadmill is an impressively quiet budget treadmill, thanks in large part to the built-in shock absorbency system. There are 15 pre-set programs on this machine’s console, covering the fitness needs of all family members. There are 3 incline settings but these must be adjusted manually, requiring you to get off the treadmill to adjust. 

The maximum speed on the MaxKare folding treadmill is 8.5 miles per hour, which will meet the training needs of most people. It is foldable, making use of the soft drop system to make this process a piece of cake along with transportation wheels to make it easy to move the treadmill around your living space. This is not an overly solid machine, with a max user weight of just 220 pounds. 

Quiet Treadmill Buyer’s Guide

Here are the key features that you need to look out for when shopping for a quiet treadmill …

Motor Size

There is no denying that the stronger the motor is, the more noise it will generate. That means that if you are in an apartment living situation or have any other situation where the noise of your treadmill is going to be an issue, you may have to make a compromise on the maximum speed. With that being said, however, you can find some impressively quiet treadmills that will provide a max speed of 10 miles per hour. That will allow the majority of people to walk, jog and run.

If you feel that you need a higher speed than 10 miles per hour to get an intense workout, look for a machine that has incline capability. Running on a 15 percent angle at 10 miles per hour will feel like running at about 13 miles per hour on the flat.

Stability

An unstable treadmill is a noisy treadmill. You will want a machine that is relatively heavy. Light treadmills simply are not stable enough to provide the rigidity that you need to keep them quiet. The more solid the frame, the better.

Look for a treadmill that comes with rubber feet to keep the machine in place as well as stabilizers that are adjustable to allow for precision balancing.

Shock Absorbency

A treadmill that has shock-reducing technology built into the running belt will definitely help to reduce the noise level. Of course, this technology will also reduce the impact on your ankles and knees. The ideal running belt softness for both noise reduction and joint friendliness should be a balance of not too hard and not too soft.

What Makes a Treadmill Noisy?

Even the very best noise-reducing treadmills will produce a certain amount of noise. The very act of running will produce some noise when your foot strikes the running belt. That will hardly be an issue if you are lucky enough to be able to set your treadmill up in the basement. However, if you are living in an apartment, even that level of noise is likely to travel through the notoriously thin walls which typify many modern apartments. 

The running belt on the treadmill may produce quite a loud slapping sound on every revolution if it is either too tight or too loose. Follow the manual instructions to get the right tension. If the moving parts in the machine are not lubricated they may also start to emit some noise. Follow the lubrication instruction and be sure to use treadmill-specific lubrication. 

Creaky floorboards are also a potential source of treadmill-related noise. 

Frequently Asked Questions

What can I do to reduce the noise coming from my treadmill?

Obviously, the first and foremost thing is to buy a treadmill that is naturally quiet. Make your selection based on the reviews above. Once you’ve got your new treadmill set up in your home, I recommend the following hacks to further reduce the noise level:

  • Consider placing the treadmill in a corner. Corners will naturally amplify any noise coming from the machine. However, this can be reduced by putting up blankets or acoustic panels. The benefit of putting the treadmill in a corner is that, if it is sitting on floorboards they are less likely to creak in a corner. 
  • Make sure that the treadmill is completely flat and stable. A wobbly treadmill is going to be a noisy treadmill. Never place your machine half on the carpet and half on the floor.
  • Use an anti-vibration mat. The thicker these rubber mats are, the more effective they will be at eliminating the unavoidable noise of your running impact.
  • Lubricate the treadmill belt every 3 months. This will offset the friction noise that is inevitable with regular use. Use a special treadmill running belt lubricant rather than your standard Walmart variety.
  • Wear quality flexible running shoes – the harder the shoe, the noisier it will be.

How regularly should I maintain my treadmill?

Regular maintenance will make your treadmill quieter, better performing, and longer-lasting. All treadmills will accumulate dust, dirt, hair, and other debris over time, which will make the machine noisier and less efficient. The best advice here is to follow the recommendation regarding maintenance in the treadmill user manual.

What other features should I look for in a treadmill?

While being an important feature, especially if you are an apartment dweller, noise levels should not be the only factor in your treadmill buying decision-making process. Here are some other factors to look out for:

  • Size – look for a treadmill that will comfortably fit into your living space while also providing at least 2 feet of space all around it. A foldable treadmill is a good option if you are an apartment dweller but keep in mind that many foldable treadmills are too light to provide the stability you need for quiet performance. 
  • Running Belt – For the best, most natural running belt performance, you will need a running belt that is 20 inches wide and 60 inches long. Cheaper models provide you with hardly any width, making it almost impossible to run with a natural stride. 
  • Built-In Programs – You should expect your treadmill to come with some in-built workout programs. These can provide variety and professional guidance to allow you to train purposefully. However, a number of treadmill manufacturers try to outdo each other by adding more and more programs. These are often a case of overkill. Don’t be swayed by treadmills that offer 20 or more programs – a dozen is more than enough to meet your training needs. 

Conclusion

It is impossible to completely eliminate the noise coming from your treadmill. Choosing a noise-reducing model from the selection that has been reviewed in this article, however, will put you in the best position to get in a quiet workout that will not disturb your neighbors or housemates. 

This article was last updated on September 28, 2021 .

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By Steve Theunissen

Steve is a former gym owner, personal trainer, and 20-year veteran of the fitness writing industry. Steve has written for websites such as Hardcore Muscle, Fitness, Carblite, and Men's Health and has been a fitness expert columnist for 2 international magazines.